70 stellar book recommendations from members of the TED community. I love reading lists and this looks like a really good one. I haven’t read a single book on this list so I can’t personally recommend any of them, but the suggestions come from some pretty amazing people (like Bill and Melinda Gates to name a few).  (via Your mega summer reading list: 70 picks from the TED community | TED Blog)
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70 stellar book recommendations from members of the TED community. I love reading lists and this looks like a really good one. I haven’t read a single book on this list so I can’t personally recommend any of them, but the suggestions come from some pretty amazing people (like Bill and Melinda Gates to name a few).  (via Your mega summer reading list: 70 picks from the TED community | TED Blog)

On the last day of every month, I post a little reminder to “roundup” your memories for the month. This simple little exercise will prompt you to take a few minutes and jot down the details of the ending month before the new one takes over.
I’ve been doing monthly roundups since January of 2006 and I can’t even begin to tell you how much easier it has made memory keeping for me! I am constantly referencing my past roundups for ideas for scrapbook pages, and I always have material for journaling now.

Look over your calendar, your blog posts, your photos, or whatever types of records you have kept throughout the month. I find that even reviewing my bank statement jogs my memory about what has happened in the month. After I answer the questions I just post them to my blog and my roundup is done.


Here’s a written list of the Roundup Prompts:
List what you watched, read, and/or listened to in the past month.
What fun things did you do with friends and/or family?
What milestones occurred? Any holidays or celebrations? How about special events?
Talk about the everyday and routine bits of life in the past month.
What good stuff happened? What were the hard things? Anything unusual?
Report on the progress you’ve made toward your goals or list any new goals you have set.

Feel free to copy and paste the above list to use for your own notes. Use these prompts as reminders as you go through your calendar and memories from the past few weeks.If you share online, it would be great if you could also include a link back to this post so others know where to find the roundup.
This is also a great time to get your photos off of SD cards or from your phone. Remember, this is just the gathering phase! Once you are done with your roundup, then it’s time to save your memories and share them if you want to.
Here are a few ideas on how you can use the roundups in your memory keeping:
Online approach
Journal approach
Photo collage approach
Scrapbook or Photobook approach
If you want to download a free Roundup Prompt card to use in your projects, I have a free gift for you here! You will have to enter your email address to get the download, but it isn’t used for anything, it’s just to make sure your file can be delivered.

Have fun doing your roundups!
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On the last day of every month, I post a little reminder to “roundup” your memories for the month. This simple little exercise will prompt you to take a few minutes and jot down the details of the ending month before the new one takes over.

I’ve been doing monthly roundups since January of 2006 and I can’t even begin to tell you how much easier it has made memory keeping for me! I am constantly referencing my past roundups for ideas for scrapbook pages, and I always have material for journaling now.

Look over your calendar, your blog posts, your photos, or whatever types of records you have kept throughout the month. I find that even reviewing my bank statement jogs my memory about what has happened in the month. After I answer the questions I just post them to my blog and my roundup is done.

Here’s a written list of the Roundup Prompts:

  • List what you watched, read, and/or listened to in the past month.
  • What fun things did you do with friends and/or family?
  • What milestones occurred? Any holidays or celebrations? How about special events?
  • Talk about the everyday and routine bits of life in the past month.
  • What good stuff happened? What were the hard things? Anything unusual?
  • Report on the progress you’ve made toward your goals or list any new goals you have set.

Feel free to copy and paste the above list to use for your own notes. Use these prompts as reminders as you go through your calendar and memories from the past few weeks.If you share online, it would be great if you could also include a link back to this post so others know where to find the roundup.

This is also a great time to get your photos off of SD cards or from your phone. Remember, this is just the gathering phase! Once you are done with your roundup, then it’s time to save your memories and share them if you want to.

Here are a few ideas on how you can use the roundups in your memory keeping:

If you want to download a free Roundup Prompt card to use in your projects, I have a free gift for you here! You will have to enter your email address to get the download, but it isn’t used for anything, it’s just to make sure your file can be delivered.

image

Have fun doing your roundups!

Travel photography tips video worth watching:
I don’t like to watch news videos online. I generally stay away from a lot of viral video content. Often times, I would much rather read an article than watch a video - unless it’s about photography or scrapbooking or photoshop or anything related to memory keeping or creating in general. Video tutorials are fabulous in my book! But there are a ton of them out there to wade through and some of them aren’t all that helpful.
So I added a new category to my blog called “worth watching” where I can share some favorite and free video tutorials (not my own) that I think my readers will really enjoy. 
Today, I’m sharing Becky Higgins travel photography tips video. She blogged about it here if you want to read her introduction. It’s a great little piece that will get you excited about documenting the details of your trips. It’s also full of great advice for general photography as well. Oh, and she doesn’t use a dslr here, just her phone camera!


Follow Katie on YouTube
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Travel photography tips video worth watching:

I don’t like to watch news videos online. I generally stay away from a lot of viral video content. Often times, I would much rather read an article than watch a video - unless it’s about photography or scrapbooking or photoshop or anything related to memory keeping or creating in general. Video tutorials are fabulous in my book! But there are a ton of them out there to wade through and some of them aren’t all that helpful.

So I added a new category to my blog called “worth watching” where I can share some favorite and free video tutorials (not my own) that I think my readers will really enjoy. 

Today, I’m sharing Becky Higgins travel photography tips video. She blogged about it here if you want to read her introduction. It’s a great little piece that will get you excited about documenting the details of your trips. It’s also full of great advice for general photography as well. Oh, and she doesn’t use a dslr here, just her phone camera!

Follow Katie on YouTube

Google is investing in future female programmers. I think this is wonderful news! My own daughter is somewhat interested in computer science, but has had little experience with the field. I’m excited to see that a force as powerful as Google is putting really big money toward making this happen. You can read all about it HERE, and it’s as awesome as it looks and sounds.


From the article:

Made With Code is a new Google initiative to motivate future female programmers. Only 18% of computer science degrees are earned by women, and Google is spending $50 million over the next three years to change those numbers.
More than 150 high school girls turned out for the event, including local chapters of the Girl Scouts of the USA, Black Girls Code and Girls Who Code. Kaling, a writer and actress, emceed the premiere, which brought in Google X Vice President Megan Smith, Clinton Foundation Vice Chair Chelsea Clinton, iLuminate creator Miral Kotb, Pixar Director of Photography Danielle Feinberg and UNICEF Innovation cofounder Erica Kochi.


Source: Mashable
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Google is investing in future female programmers. I think this is wonderful news! My own daughter is somewhat interested in computer science, but has had little experience with the field. I’m excited to see that a force as powerful as Google is putting really big money toward making this happen. You can read all about it HERE, and it’s as awesome as it looks and sounds.


From the article:

Made With Code is a new Google initiative to motivate future female programmers. Only 18% of computer science degrees are earned by women, and Google is spending $50 million over the next three years to change those numbers.
More than 150 high school girls turned out for the event, including local chapters of the Girl Scouts of the USA, Black Girls Code and Girls Who Code. Kaling, a writer and actress, emceed the premiere, which brought in Google X Vice President Megan Smith, Clinton Foundation Vice Chair Chelsea Clinton, iLuminate creator Miral Kotb, Pixar Director of Photography Danielle Feinberg and UNICEF Innovation cofounder Erica Kochi.


Source: Mashable
Zoom
Info
Google is investing in future female programmers. I think this is wonderful news! My own daughter is somewhat interested in computer science, but has had little experience with the field. I’m excited to see that a force as powerful as Google is putting really big money toward making this happen. You can read all about it HERE, and it’s as awesome as it looks and sounds.


From the article:

Made With Code is a new Google initiative to motivate future female programmers. Only 18% of computer science degrees are earned by women, and Google is spending $50 million over the next three years to change those numbers.
More than 150 high school girls turned out for the event, including local chapters of the Girl Scouts of the USA, Black Girls Code and Girls Who Code. Kaling, a writer and actress, emceed the premiere, which brought in Google X Vice President Megan Smith, Clinton Foundation Vice Chair Chelsea Clinton, iLuminate creator Miral Kotb, Pixar Director of Photography Danielle Feinberg and UNICEF Innovation cofounder Erica Kochi.


Source: Mashable
Zoom
Info
Google is investing in future female programmers. I think this is wonderful news! My own daughter is somewhat interested in computer science, but has had little experience with the field. I’m excited to see that a force as powerful as Google is putting really big money toward making this happen. You can read all about it HERE, and it’s as awesome as it looks and sounds.


From the article:

Made With Code is a new Google initiative to motivate future female programmers. Only 18% of computer science degrees are earned by women, and Google is spending $50 million over the next three years to change those numbers.
More than 150 high school girls turned out for the event, including local chapters of the Girl Scouts of the USA, Black Girls Code and Girls Who Code. Kaling, a writer and actress, emceed the premiere, which brought in Google X Vice President Megan Smith, Clinton Foundation Vice Chair Chelsea Clinton, iLuminate creator Miral Kotb, Pixar Director of Photography Danielle Feinberg and UNICEF Innovation cofounder Erica Kochi.


Source: Mashable
Zoom
Info
Google is investing in future female programmers. I think this is wonderful news! My own daughter is somewhat interested in computer science, but has had little experience with the field. I’m excited to see that a force as powerful as Google is putting really big money toward making this happen. You can read all about it HERE, and it’s as awesome as it looks and sounds.


From the article:

Made With Code is a new Google initiative to motivate future female programmers. Only 18% of computer science degrees are earned by women, and Google is spending $50 million over the next three years to change those numbers.
More than 150 high school girls turned out for the event, including local chapters of the Girl Scouts of the USA, Black Girls Code and Girls Who Code. Kaling, a writer and actress, emceed the premiere, which brought in Google X Vice President Megan Smith, Clinton Foundation Vice Chair Chelsea Clinton, iLuminate creator Miral Kotb, Pixar Director of Photography Danielle Feinberg and UNICEF Innovation cofounder Erica Kochi.


Source: Mashable
Zoom
Info
Google is investing in future female programmers. I think this is wonderful news! My own daughter is somewhat interested in computer science, but has had little experience with the field. I’m excited to see that a force as powerful as Google is putting really big money toward making this happen. You can read all about it HERE, and it’s as awesome as it looks and sounds.


From the article:

Made With Code is a new Google initiative to motivate future female programmers. Only 18% of computer science degrees are earned by women, and Google is spending $50 million over the next three years to change those numbers.
More than 150 high school girls turned out for the event, including local chapters of the Girl Scouts of the USA, Black Girls Code and Girls Who Code. Kaling, a writer and actress, emceed the premiere, which brought in Google X Vice President Megan Smith, Clinton Foundation Vice Chair Chelsea Clinton, iLuminate creator Miral Kotb, Pixar Director of Photography Danielle Feinberg and UNICEF Innovation cofounder Erica Kochi.


Source: Mashable
Zoom
Info
Google is investing in future female programmers. I think this is wonderful news! My own daughter is somewhat interested in computer science, but has had little experience with the field. I’m excited to see that a force as powerful as Google is putting really big money toward making this happen. You can read all about it HERE, and it’s as awesome as it looks and sounds.


From the article:

Made With Code is a new Google initiative to motivate future female programmers. Only 18% of computer science degrees are earned by women, and Google is spending $50 million over the next three years to change those numbers.
More than 150 high school girls turned out for the event, including local chapters of the Girl Scouts of the USA, Black Girls Code and Girls Who Code. Kaling, a writer and actress, emceed the premiere, which brought in Google X Vice President Megan Smith, Clinton Foundation Vice Chair Chelsea Clinton, iLuminate creator Miral Kotb, Pixar Director of Photography Danielle Feinberg and UNICEF Innovation cofounder Erica Kochi.


Source: Mashable
Zoom
Info
Google is investing in future female programmers. I think this is wonderful news! My own daughter is somewhat interested in computer science, but has had little experience with the field. I’m excited to see that a force as powerful as Google is putting really big money toward making this happen. You can read all about it HERE, and it’s as awesome as it looks and sounds.


From the article:

Made With Code is a new Google initiative to motivate future female programmers. Only 18% of computer science degrees are earned by women, and Google is spending $50 million over the next three years to change those numbers.
More than 150 high school girls turned out for the event, including local chapters of the Girl Scouts of the USA, Black Girls Code and Girls Who Code. Kaling, a writer and actress, emceed the premiere, which brought in Google X Vice President Megan Smith, Clinton Foundation Vice Chair Chelsea Clinton, iLuminate creator Miral Kotb, Pixar Director of Photography Danielle Feinberg and UNICEF Innovation cofounder Erica Kochi.


Source: Mashable
Zoom
Info

Google is investing in future female programmers. I think this is wonderful news! My own daughter is somewhat interested in computer science, but has had little experience with the field. I’m excited to see that a force as powerful as Google is putting really big money toward making this happen. You can read all about it HERE, and it’s as awesome as it looks and sounds.

From the article:

Made With Code is a new Google initiative to motivate future female programmers. Only 18% of computer science degrees are earned by women, and Google is spending $50 million over the next three years to change those numbers.

More than 150 high school girls turned out for the event, including local chapters of the Girl Scouts of the USA, Black Girls Code and Girls Who Code. Kaling, a writer and actress, emceed the premiere, which brought in Google X Vice President Megan Smith, Clinton Foundation Vice Chair Chelsea Clinton, iLuminate creator Miral Kotb, Pixar Director of Photography Danielle Feinberg and UNICEF Innovation cofounder Erica Kochi.

Source: Mashable

How to make incredible nature sunprints:
This beautiful project is in the current Martha Stewart Living magazine and you can also find detailed instructions here. All you need to do is collect interesting objects from the outdoors (leaves, shells, feathers), and use the sun’s rays to produce enchanting negatives and silhouettes. It’s literally fun in the sun that’s super easy (and kids will love)! 
I can see so many possibilities for this project that range from frame-worthy masterpieces to hang on the wall to miniature works of art to include on notecards or in scrapbook albums. 
Project photos by Jennifer Causey, used with permission from Martha Stewart Media.
Be sure to pick up the July/August issue of Martha Stewart Living, available at newsstands and for iPad now.
Zoom
Info
How to make incredible nature sunprints:
This beautiful project is in the current Martha Stewart Living magazine and you can also find detailed instructions here. All you need to do is collect interesting objects from the outdoors (leaves, shells, feathers), and use the sun’s rays to produce enchanting negatives and silhouettes. It’s literally fun in the sun that’s super easy (and kids will love)! 
I can see so many possibilities for this project that range from frame-worthy masterpieces to hang on the wall to miniature works of art to include on notecards or in scrapbook albums. 
Project photos by Jennifer Causey, used with permission from Martha Stewart Media.
Be sure to pick up the July/August issue of Martha Stewart Living, available at newsstands and for iPad now.
Zoom
Info
How to make incredible nature sunprints:
This beautiful project is in the current Martha Stewart Living magazine and you can also find detailed instructions here. All you need to do is collect interesting objects from the outdoors (leaves, shells, feathers), and use the sun’s rays to produce enchanting negatives and silhouettes. It’s literally fun in the sun that’s super easy (and kids will love)! 
I can see so many possibilities for this project that range from frame-worthy masterpieces to hang on the wall to miniature works of art to include on notecards or in scrapbook albums. 
Project photos by Jennifer Causey, used with permission from Martha Stewart Media.
Be sure to pick up the July/August issue of Martha Stewart Living, available at newsstands and for iPad now.
Zoom
Info
How to make incredible nature sunprints:
This beautiful project is in the current Martha Stewart Living magazine and you can also find detailed instructions here. All you need to do is collect interesting objects from the outdoors (leaves, shells, feathers), and use the sun’s rays to produce enchanting negatives and silhouettes. It’s literally fun in the sun that’s super easy (and kids will love)! 
I can see so many possibilities for this project that range from frame-worthy masterpieces to hang on the wall to miniature works of art to include on notecards or in scrapbook albums. 
Project photos by Jennifer Causey, used with permission from Martha Stewart Media.
Be sure to pick up the July/August issue of Martha Stewart Living, available at newsstands and for iPad now.
Zoom
Info
How to make incredible nature sunprints:
This beautiful project is in the current Martha Stewart Living magazine and you can also find detailed instructions here. All you need to do is collect interesting objects from the outdoors (leaves, shells, feathers), and use the sun’s rays to produce enchanting negatives and silhouettes. It’s literally fun in the sun that’s super easy (and kids will love)! 
I can see so many possibilities for this project that range from frame-worthy masterpieces to hang on the wall to miniature works of art to include on notecards or in scrapbook albums. 
Project photos by Jennifer Causey, used with permission from Martha Stewart Media.
Be sure to pick up the July/August issue of Martha Stewart Living, available at newsstands and for iPad now.
Zoom
Info

How to make incredible nature sunprints:

This beautiful project is in the current Martha Stewart Living magazine and you can also find detailed instructions here. All you need to do is collect interesting objects from the outdoors (leaves, shells, feathers), and use the sun’s rays to produce enchanting negatives and silhouettes. It’s literally fun in the sun that’s super easy (and kids will love)! 

I can see so many possibilities for this project that range from frame-worthy masterpieces to hang on the wall to miniature works of art to include on notecards or in scrapbook albums. 

Project photos by Jennifer Causey, used with permission from Martha Stewart Media.

Be sure to pick up the July/August issue of Martha Stewart Living, available at newsstands and for iPad now.

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